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clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie says "she has my vote." williams says i think she has been a great job for secretary of state but will not vote for her for president. andy says hillary 2016. military spouses against the
clinton. president truman's oldest grandson, who was the first truman to travel to japan. tonight on c-span 3, a look at hiroshima. a talk with his trip and what he learned it. learned through his words teacher made that his grandfather went through and now he went through in hiroshige of. 6:00 for those on the west coast on c-span 3. here is a preview. [video clip] >> i tried to look down and i saw so many dead bodies floating on the surface. people --'s so many the people suffered from the burned bodies. they went into water. it jumped into the river. >> that was a survivor of the bombings in hiroshima telling her story for the first time to daniel on his first visit to the two cities where the bomb was dropped the in 1945. you are listening for the first time. what did you see your role as as you were listening to it? >> just to be there to listen to her and to let her speak and to let her do this for the first time. >> for her understanding she was talking to the grandson of the man who made a decision to drop the bomb. did she talk to you about that? >> she did not. a lot the came
and clinton and everyone else thereafter, when they did that, now i understand they are just not the party that any of us would want to be involved with. that's all i have to say. host: the video we just showed was shot by a c-span producer with his iphone. it was the former senator in a wheelchair making his way into the chamber yesterday for that vote. here's the new york times with that story. and a screen grab. seven he sat in support of the tree. -- he sat in support of the treaty. he's 89 and is a republican at who was the majority leader. his wife elizabeth dole and he left the port and republicans voted down the street. he was recently released from walter reed military center. now an independent caller from ohio, lee. caller: good morning. i am calling about something i have not heard about. people willing to take the $15 or $20 extra they're getting from the to% tax break, it is coming off their pension when they retire. social security is based on what you contribute. host: you are talking about the payroll tax cut, extending that possibly as part of the fiscal cliff negotiation
clinton early in december talked about hiv and aids and where we are in research, and said and aids free generation is not just a rallying cry, but the goal within our reach. what do you think of the statement and what does it mean for your organization, dr. fauci? guest: thank you for the question. secretary clinton has been a leader on the concept, and she introduced the concept of an aids-free generation, and the point she is making is 31 years into the pandemic we have the tools based on clinical research -- prevention tools, and diagnostic tools and treatment tools to turn around dramatically the projection of the pandemic globally. we are already starting to see that. it is a matter of implementing these things. treatment is striking -- the difference between 30 years ago in what we do now, not only to save the lives of individuals, but when you treat someone that is hiv infected and you bring down the level of virus to blow a detectable level, you -- -- to be lower deductible -- detectable level, you dramatically decrease the chance they would in fact a partner. host: is there bet
. going back to the clinton tax rates, remember, the average american family has taken a hit. median income four years ago was $54,000 a year. it is about $50,000 a year now. this portion of the population has been squeezed. adding taxes on 90% will not be helpful. how much do you want folks to bear? freezing those tax rates for the overwhelming majority of americans is a smart thing to do. host: you said fight later on. guest: the fight would start the next day. we could do what i'm talking about, and negotiations could continue. doing what i'm talking about does not violate what either side is fighting over. they both say this is something we want to do. why not make sure we do not have some last-minute failure at the end of december. guest: what gives you confidence that democrats would agree later on? guest: this is where i disagree with some of my colleagues. they seem to think the american people are leveraged, and this is the democrats leverage. our leverage is in the spending and entitlement issues. the president and his negotiators are smart and able people. they know the re
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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